Annual Notification to Parents Regarding Confidentiality of Student Education Records

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children's education records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18 or attends a school beyond the high school level. Students to whom the rights have transferred are "eligible students."

  •          Parents or eligible students have the right to inspect and review the student's education records maintained by the school within 45 days of a request made to the school administrator. Schools are not required to provide copies of records unless it is impossible for parents or eligible students to review the records without copies. Schools may charge a fee for copies.
  •          Parents or eligible students have the right to request in writing that a school correct records that they believe to be

inaccurate or misleading. If the school decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student then has the right to a formal hearing. After the hearing, if the school still decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student has the right to place a statement with the record setting forth his or her view about the contested information.

  •          Generally, schools must have written permission from the parent or eligible student in order to release any information from a student's education record. However, FERPA allows schools to disclose those records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions:
  •  School officials with legitimate educational interest_ A school official is a person employed or contracted by the school to serve as an administrator, supervisor, teacher, or support staff member (including health staff, law enforcement personnel, attorney, auditor, or other similar roles); a person serving on the school board; or a parent or student serving on an official committee or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks; _ A legitimate educational interest means the review of records is necessary to fulfill a professional responsibility for the school;
  •  Other schools to which a student is seeking to enroll;
  •  Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes;
  •  Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student;
  •  Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school;
  •  Accrediting organizations;
  •  To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena;
  •  Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and
  •  State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law.

Schools may disclose, without consent, "directory" information such as a student's name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, honors and awards, sports participation (including height and weight of athletes) and dates of attendance unless notified by the parents or eligible student that the school is not to disclose the information without consent.

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is a federal law that protects the rights of students with disabilities.

In addition to standard school records, for children with disabilities education records could include evaluation and testing materials, medical and health information, Individualized Education Programs and related notices and consents, progress reports, materials related to disciplinary actions, and mediation agreements. Such information is gathered from a number of sources, including the student's parents and staff of the school of attendance. Also, with parental permission, information may be gathered from additional pertinent sources, such as doctors and other health care providers. This information is collected to assure the child is identified, evaluated, and provided a Free Appropriate Public Education in accordance with state and federal special education laws. Each agency participating under Part B of IDEA must assure that at all stages of gathering, storing, retaining and disclosing education records to third parties that it complies with the federal confidentiality laws. In addition, the destruction of any education records of a child with a disability must be in accordance with IDEA regulatory requirements. For additional information or to file a complaint, you may call the federal government at (202) 260-3887 (voice) or 1-800-877- 8339 (TDD) OR the Arizona Department of Education (ADE/ESS) at (602) 542-4013. Or you may contact:

Family Policy Compliance Office

U.S. Department of Education

400 Maryland Avenue, SW

Washington, D.C. 20202-5901

Arizona Department of Education

Exceptional Student Services

1535 W. Jefferson, BIN 24

Phoenix, AZ 85007

This notice is available in English and Spanish on the ADE website at www.ade.az.gov/ess/resources under forms. For assistance in obtaining this notice in other languages, contact the ADE/ESS at the above phone/address.